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Saturday, March 23 • 2:30pm - 4:00pm
Business Strategies for Agricultural Technology Commercialization

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A wide range of innovative and affordable technologies have emerged to facilitate the creation, expansion and streamlining of Food Value Chains (FVCs) in developing countries. These technologies target various value chain activities, including agricultural production, processing, storage, marketing, distribution and consumption. Low-cost greenhouses, solar food dryers, threshers, grinders, storage and packaging equipment are just a few technologies that have the potential to improve the livelihoods of millions of smallholder farmers and agricultural workers while making FVCs more efficient and bolstering food security. To successfully disseminate these technologies, entrepreneurs need to develop sound business strategies to get their products to market as well as business models that potential customers can adopt to sustain and profit from the technology. This paper presents a typology of systemic multi-stakeholder business models to assist technology entrepreneurs in commercializing and integrating their agricultural technologies into FVCs.

Speakers

Amy Copley

Amy Copley is a recent graduate of the Pennsylvania State University where she studied International Relations and French. She also participated in the Penn State Humanitarian Engineering and Social Entrepreneurship (HESE) program, through which she worked on business development for a low-cost greenhouse entrepreneurial venture. This fall she will begin her graduate studies in International Development and Humanitarian Emergencies at the London School of Economics. Her interests include...
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Curtis Eckard

Curtis Eckard is a junior studying Supply Chain Management and Information Systems in the Smeal College of Business at the Pennsylvania State University. He attended his first two years of university at Penn State Altoona, where he found his passion for social entrepreneurship through an organization called Students for Free Enterprise (SIFE). In this organization, he served as project manager for multiple projects and president of the club during his sophomore year. His primary...
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Khanjan Mehta

Khanjan Mehta is the Director of the Humanitarian Engineering and Social Entrepreneurship (HESE) Program at Penn State University. His professional interests include innovative system integration, high-tech entrepreneurship and international social entrepreneurship. Khanjan loves connecting concepts, people, computers and devices. A basic philosophy behind his work is the convergence of disciplines, concepts, cultures, and countries to create a freer, friendlier, fairer and more sustainable...
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Arianna De Reus

Undergraduate Student at The Pennsylvania State University
Arianna De Reus is a sophomore majoring in Community, Environment and Development in the college of Agricultural Sciences with and international focus. Arianna grew up volunteering on service-learning trips in the Dominican Republic, Tanzania, the Democratic Republic of Congo and Rwanda. At Penn State she has had the opportunity to continue this work in Honduras, Kenya and Rwanda. Arianna’s two trips to Tanzania and eight trips to the Dominican Republic prepared her to accompany her mom to...
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Saturday March 23, 2013 2:30pm - 4:00pm
Room 16

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